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The information below contains helpful precautions to minimize the chance of becoming a victim during your trip to Seychelles and also provides other safety tips for travellers.

 

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Seychelles Travel Safety

 

The information below contains helpful precautions to minimize the chance of becoming a victim during your trip to Seychelles and also provides other safety tips for travellers.

 

Stay safe

 

When you travel abroad, the odds are you will have a safe and incident-free trip. Travelers can, however, become victims of crime and violence, or experience unexpected difficulties.

 

Be alert for your own security in the Seychelles. Exercise common sense and look out for suspicious behaviour, as you would anywhere in the world. Be a smart traveler. Before your trip: Organize comprehensive travel insurance and check what circumstances and activities are not covered by your policy. Register your travel and contact details, so that you can be contacted in an emergency.

 

The temporary ban on swimming at certain locations on Praslin imposed after two fatal shark attacks in 2011 has been lifted by the Seychelles Maritime Safety Authority following the introduction of Life Guard services at Anse Lazio & Cote D’Or on the Island of Praslin .

 

Altough shark attacks are extremely rare, there were two fatal incidents (one involving a British national) off Anse Lazio on the island of Praslin in 2011. The temporary ban on swimming at certain locations on Praslin imposed after these attacks has been lifted by the Seychelles Maritime Safety Authority following the introduction of Life Guard services at Anse Lazio & Cote D’Or on the Island of Praslin.

Drownings do occasionally occur; be careful when swimming/snorkelling. Seasonal changes in sea conditions mean there are strong currents on beaches at different times. Beaches that offer safe swimming during the south east monsoon (May-September) may not be safe during the north east monsoon (November-March). Seek local advice. Dangerous rip currents can occur off the popular Beau Vallon beach when the sea is rough.

 

Piracy is a significant threat in the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean and has occurred as far as 1,000 nautical miles from the coast of Somalia. Sailing vessels are particularly vulnerable. We therefore advise against all but essential travel by yacht and leisure craft on the high seas (more than 12 nautical miles from shore) in the Gulf of Aden, Arabian Sea and part of the Indian Ocean. This includes activities within the Seychelles Economic Exclusive Zone (EEZ) beyond twelve miles of the inner granitic islands. Travel by air to these islands is not affected. See our Piracy in the Indian Ocean page.

 

  • Land based tourism in the Seychelles is currently unaffected by piracy activity.

  • You should be aware of an increase in petty theft on beaches, from parked cars and accommodation.

 

Medical facilities in Seychelles are limited, especially on the more remote islands where doctors are often unavailable. The main hospital (including Accident and Emergency services) is in Victoria, tel: + 248 4388000.

Bring sun protection creams and insect repellents with you, as local supplies are erratic and expensive.

You should drink or use only boiled or bottled water and avoid ice in drinks. If you suffer from diarrhoea during a visit to the Seychelles you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should exercise normal precautions to avoid exposure to HIV/AIDS. See our HIV and AIDS page.

You should seek medical advice before travelling to the Seychelles and ensure that all appropriate vaccinations are up-to-date. For further information on vaccination requirements, health outbreaks and general disease protection and prevention you should visit the websites of the National Travel Health Network and Centre

 

Most visits to Seychelles are trouble-free.

 

Some safety advice:

 

  • Always try to travel light. You can move more quickly and will be more likely to have a free hand. You will also be less tired and less likely to set your luggage down, leaving it unattended.

 

  • Beware of pickpockets. They often have an accomplice who will:
  1. jostle you,
  2. ask you for directions or the time,
  3. point to something spilled on your clothing,
  4. or distract you by creating a disturbance.

 

Make a note of emergency telephone numbers you may need: police, fire, your hotel, and the nearest embassy or consulate.

 

  • Avoid remote areas alone.

 

  • Do not leave valuables in view in your car.

 

  • Avoid unexpected offers of (seemingly free) guided tours. Ulterior motives are common.

 

  • Do not patronize unlicensed taxis . Some robbers use this trick to lure and attack their victims.

 


 

 

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